House

186 Oriental Parade, Oriental Bay, Wellington
Map
  • Constructed

    1909 - 1910

  • Architect(s)

    Joshua Charlesworth

  • Builder(s)

    Unknown

  • This house has a high level of architectural merit for its visual appeal and reasonably high level of authenticity.

    Although this house has had a rather modest and typical history for a residential building, it is associated with several well known Wellingtonians which elevates its historic value, in particular it is associated with theatre enthusiast and journalist Herbert Bridge and prominent architect Peter Beaven. It also has historic importance for its association with architect Joshua Charlesworth.

    This house has significant townscape value for the key role that it plays as a part of a distinctive Edwardian row of houses in an extremely popular and well visited area. This house, as a part of the group of Charlesworth houses, contributes a strong sense of historicity and continuity to Oriental Parade.

  • close History
    • This house, situated at 186 Oriental Parade, is the anchor of a residential development by the well known Edwardian architect Joshua Charlesworth, and as such it has considerable rarity in Wellington. It has a high level of architectural value for its visual appeal and the retention of a reasonable level of authenticity in an area that has been considerably changed since the time of its construction.

      In 1906, Joshua Charlesworth (1861-1925), already a successful and prominent architect in Wellington, embarked on a speculative housing development on vacant land owned by the Wellington Diocesan Board of the Anglican Church on Oriental Parade. Charlesworth leased the land for 42 years and initially built eight houses, the construction of which was finished in 1907. Following construction Charlesworth subdivided the properties and leased them to individual occupiers.

      No. 186, the ninth house in this subdivision, was not completed until 1909. The first listed occupant was Herbert Bridge (1849-1932), a well known journalist who was an editor of small newspapers prior to coming to Wellington. Once settled in Wellington he worked for both the Dominion and the Evening Post newspapers. Bridge was also prominent in amateur theatricals and musicals and wrote his own plays and comic operas. He lived in this house, until his death in 1932, with his wife Leonore, who remained in the house until 1955.

      The first listed lessee of the property following Charlesworth was George Leighton in 1921, and later Herbert Bridge’s son Cyprian took over the lease.

      In 1959 the house was subdivided into three flats – one downstairs and two smaller flats, one a bedsit, upstairs – for Margaret Morrison who originally leased the house in 1948 for a period of 21 years and later lived in 186a. She renewed her lease in 1969 for a further 21 years. There were numerous tenants over the period that she leased the house, but it appears that few stayed for a long period.

      Margaret Morrison died in 1973 and the lease, which had been placed on an individual Certificate of Title in 1969, was transferred in quick succession to Robert and Millie Eden in 1973, architect Peter Beaven the same year, Westwools Proprietary Ltd., in 1977, and David Headley in 1981. In 1996 the property was purchased by Peter Cullen, Solicitor, and Michael Curtis, Chartered Accountant. The Wellington Diocesan Board of the Anglican Church continued to own the land and control the leases until this time. The house has been through few major changes since it was purchased by Peter Cullen and Michael Curtis.

      Although this house has not had a particularly memorable history, it is associated with several reasonably prominent citizens, including journalist and theatrical enthusiast Herbert Bridge and prominent architects Peter Beaven and Joshua Charlesworth, so has historic significance for that.

      The house appears to have had few further alterations following its conversion into three flats, and the exterior has had few significant modifications. It is the only example in the Oriental Parade Charlesworth houses designed with a gable and extended wing facing the street, a feature that was likely included due to the oblong shaped site that the house occupies. This house, like its counterparts, has significant townscape value for the key role that it plays as part of the distinctive, Edwardian row of houses in an extremely popular area of Wellington.

    • Modifications close
      • 1906 - 1906
      • Application for Construction of 186, 188, 190, 192, 194, 196, 200, and 202 Oriental Parade (00053: 128: 7144)
      • 1909 - 1910
      • Original construction
      • 1929
      • Addition – Sun porch (00056: 90: B8486)
      • 1959 - 1959
      • Alterations – Convert house into three flats (00058: 121: C5847)
      • 1997 - 1997
      • Alterations – Garage (00078: 91: 31963)
      • 2001 - 2001
      • Alterations – New garage and reinstatement of retaining wall (00078: 1182: 79664)
      • 2009 - 2009
      • Alterations – Rock anchor and shot-crete retaining wall (00078: 3217: 202180)
    • Occupation History close
      • unknown
      • Not Assessed
  • close Architectural Information
    • Building Classification(s) close

      Not assessed

    • Architecture close

      The front façade of 186 Oriental Parade had a gabled end, with a double height bay window. To its left is a two storey verandah, enclosed on the first floor and partially glazed on the ground floor on two sides, the latter of which are original. To the right is a shorter addition, once a sunroom, with concrete stairs leading up on the right. The house is entered via a niche in a concrete retaining wall, alongside a garage that extends beneath the house.

      This house is clad in rusticated weatherboards, with lapped weatherboards on the enclosed verandah. The roof is tiled.

      This house is one of nine designed by Charlesworth on Oriental Parade, and is the only one that features a gable and extended wing facing the street. At its widest, the house extends all the way along to the rear retaining wall. Like its neighbours, the house is a dignified and formal Edwardian residence, with some of the decorative half timbering evident on the other houses.

      The interior of the house has not been inspected, but appears to have been converted back into a single dwelling.

    • Materials close

      Rusticated weatherboards

      Tiled roof

    • Setting close

      This house, as with the other Charlesworth houses, sits on a bench above Oriental Parade, at the foot of the bluffs below St Gerard’s. At the street front, a substantial masonry retaining wall supports the land, and a garage and steps have been cut out of the land behind the wall. A further brick retaining wall at the rear of the bench anchors the flat land. The bluff provides a rich green backdrop to the houses, and in conjunction with their elevated position, gives them great prominence in the Bay area.

  • close Cultural Value

    This house has a high level of architectural merit for its visual appeal and reasonably high level of authenticity.

    Although this house has had a rather modest and typical history for a residential building, it is associated with several well known Wellingtonians which elevates its historic value, in particular it is associated with theatre enthusiast and journalist Herbert Bridge and prominent architect Peter Beaven. It also has historic importance for its association with architect Joshua Charlesworth.

    This house has significant townscape value for the key role that it plays as a part of a distinctive Edwardian row of houses in an extremely popular and well visited area. This house, as a part of the group of Charlesworth houses, contributes a strong sense of historicity and continuity to Oriental Parade.

    • Aesthetic Value close
      • Architectural

        Does the item have architectural or artistic value for characteristics that may include its design, style, era, form, scale, materials, colour, texture, patina of age, quality of space, craftsmanship, smells, and sounds?

        This house has a high level of architectural merit for its visual appeal and reasonably high level of authenticity.

      • Group

        Is the item part of a group of buildings, structures, or sites that taken together have coherence because of their age, history, style, scale, materials, or use?

        This building is a large and significant member of an early residential development, the group has considerable rarity value in Wellington.

      • Townscape

        Does the item have townscape value for the part it plays in defining a space or street; providing visual interest; its role as a landmark; or the contribution it makes to the character and sense of place of Wellington?

        This house has significant townscape value for the key role that it plays as a part of a distinctive Edwardian row of houses in an extremely popular and well visited area. Ur contributes considerable visual amenity, character, and sense of place to Oriental Parade.

    • Historic Value close
      • Association

        Is the item associated with an important person, group, or organisation?

        Although this house has had a rather modest and typical history for a residential building, it is associated with several well known Wellingtonians which elevates its historic value, in particular it is associated with theatre enthusiast and journalist Herbert Bridge and prominent architect Peter Beaven. It also has historic importance for its association with architect Joshua Charlesworth.

    • Scientific Value close

      Not assessed

    • Social Value close
      • Identity/Sense Of Place/Continuity

        Is the item a focus of community, regional, or national identity? Does the item contribute to sense of place or continuity?

        This house, as a part of the group of Charlesworth houses, contributes a strong sense of historicity and continuity to Oriental Parade.

    • Level of Cultural Heritage Significance close
      • Authentic

        Does the item have authenticity or integrity because it retains significant fabric from the time of its construction or from later periods when important additions or modifications were carried out?

        Although the verandahs have been enclosed, the exterior of this house is largely unchanged since the time of its construction, giving a strong sense of historical continuity and authenticity to the building.

      • Rare

        Is the item rare, unique, unusual, seminal, influential, or outstanding?

        As a part of an early residential development by well known Edwardian architect Joshua Charlesworth, this house does have considerable rarity value in Wellington.

      • Representative

        Is the item a good example of the class it represents?

        This house is a good representative of an Edwardian residential building, and is the only one of the Oriental Parade Charlesworth houses designed with a gable and extended wing facing the street.

      • Importance

        Is the item important for any of the above characteristics at a local, regional, national, or international level?

        This house is of local importance for its architectural, townscape, group, historic, rarity, and authenticity values.

    • Local / Regional / National / International Importance close

      Not assessed

  • close Site Detail
    • District Plan Number

      12/469 (excluding rear portion, rear retaining walls, and front boundary wall, existing and extended raised patio area, landing area, balustrades and capping, as defined in Appendix 24)

    • Legal Description

      Lot 2 DP 5221

    • Heritage New Zealand Listed

      Not listed

    • Archaeological Site

      NZAA Central City Archaeological Area R27/270

    • Current Uses

      unknown

    • Former Uses

      unknown

    • Has building been funded

      No

    • Funding Amount

      Not applicable

    • Earthquake Prone Status

      Outside Earthquake Prone Policy

  • close Additional Information
    • Sources close
      • Kelly, Michael. ‘186 Oriental Parade’. Wellington City Council: Unpublished heritage assessment prepared for plan change 53, 2005.
      • NZHPT professional biographies
      • Archives: 1906 Construction of 186, 188, 190, 192, 194, 196, 200, and 202 Oriental Parade (00053: 128: 7144)
      • Archives: 1929 Addition – Sun porch (00056: 90: B8486)
      • Archives: 1959 Alterations – Convert house into three flats (00058: 121: C5847)
      • Archives: 1997 Alterations – Garage (00078: 91: 31963)
      • Archives: 2001 Alterations – New garage and reinstatement of retaining wall (00078: 1182: 79664)
      • Archives: 2009 Alterations – Rock anchor and shot-crete retaining wall (00078: 3217: 202180)
    • Technical Documentation close

      Not available

    • Footnotes close

      Not available

Last updated: 10/27/2016 3:56:01 AM