Coene sheds and slipway

Clyde Quay Boat Harbour, Oriental Bay, Wellington
Map
  • Constructed

    1942 - 1942

  • Builder(s)

  • Although amongst the most recent of the structures at the boat harbour site the Coene sheds have historic significance for their association with the American use of the boat harbour during the Second World War and their long-standing use in their current configuration.

    The two sheds and the slipway have amenity value in their ongoing use.

    In form, the sheds relate best to the former club-house to the east and they have group value with that building in particular. They also have group value with the other structures on the boat harbour.

  • close History
    • The Coene sheds and their materials have their origins in one of the three two-storey timber buildings constructed on the boat harbour circa 1942 by the Public Works Department for the US Navy. A slipway was built at the same time and the building that provided the components of the Coene sheds was the one that flanked the slipway. The original use of the buildings was accommodation and storage for launches and amphibian landing craft – the concrete slipway facilitated water access for these vessels.

      At the end of the war, the three larger buildings passed into the control of the Wellington Harbour Board and were converted by the government to serve as a 100-bed boy’s hostel, with a five year lease; the keys were handed over on 2 October 1945. Although the lease was subsequently extended a further 5 years, the relationship of the hostel with the boat harbour and local residents was not always a happy one and by 1954 a petition from local residents demanded the removal of the “temporary” hostel. In May 1955 the Minister of Labour and Employment announced its relocation to the Oriental Hostel, further around the bay. In March of the following year it was decided that one of the three timber buildings would be kept and the other two demolished. The remaining building was transferred to the WHB for £1,500 in July 1957.

      The surviving two-storey building was dismantled and rebuilt in its present form in 1959, as two small pavilions on either side of the slipway. They became known as the east and west Coene sheds and remain largely in their 1959 form today. Both buildings are owned by the Wellington City Council.

      The present slipway was constructed in 1946 by the Wellington Harbour Board and leased to the RPNYC for £43 per year; a diesel pump and underground tank were added in 1949.

    • Modifications close
      • 1942 - 1942
      • Three two-storey timber buildings constructed on this site
      • 1945 - 1945
      • Converted to a boy’s hostel
      • 1946 - 1946
      • Slipway constructed
      • 1949 - 1949
      • Diesel pump and underground tank added
      • 1955 - 1955
      • Boy’s hostel moved to the Oriental Hostel
      • c.1956 - c.1956
      • Three buildings demolished
      • 1959 - 1959
      • Coene Sheds rebuilt from materials
    • Occupation History close
      • unknown
      • Royal Port Nicholson Yacht Club
  • close Architectural Information
    • Building Classification(s) close

      Not assessed

    • Architecture close

      The Coene sheds are two unassuming flat-roofed structures located on either side of the slipway to the east of the club-house. Each building is single storey and clad in bevel-back timber weatherboards with timber casement windows, timber door joinery and a concrete floor. The major feature of each shed is a large glazed horizontally sliding door – located in the centre of the main elevation of the west shed and on the right-hand side of the east shed (this appears to have been moved from the centre). The door to the west shed has a single glazed door let in to the centre; the door to the east shed has a small hatch in the centre.

      The concrete slipway is located between the two sheds, with a narrow path running around its perimeter which provides access around it. The base of the slipway is recessed below the general level of the hard. A large boat cradle runs on rails into the water; winching and other equipment associated with the cradle is distributed around the sides of the slipway.

      The east shed has its own slipway, used for launching the rescue boat. A flight of steps rising to Oriental Parade separates the east shed from the former club-house.

      The interiors of the sheds were not inspected (2005).

    • Materials close

      Each building is clad in bevel-back timber weatherboards with timber casement windows, timber door joinery and a concrete floor.

    • Setting close

      The two Coene sheds sit to the east side of the Royal Port Nicholson Yacht Club Club-house building, flanking the present slipway.

      The Clyde Quay boat harbour is a distinctive and unique Wellington landmark, set on the inner harbour beneath the hills of Mount Victoria. Bounded by the Freyberg Pool to the east and the (now demolished) Overseas Passenger Terminal to the west, it is a notable heritage area for its unique and quite authentic collection of heritage buildings, structures and objects. Until recently, it was the only marina in the inner Wellington harbour.

  • close Cultural Value

    Although amongst the most recent of the structures at the boat harbour site the Coene sheds have historic significance for their association with the American use of the boat harbour during the Second World War and their long-standing use in their current configuration.

    The two sheds and the slipway have amenity value in their ongoing use.

    In form, the sheds relate best to the former club-house to the east and they have group value with that building in particular. They also have group value with the other structures on the boat harbour.

    • Aesthetic Value close
      • Architectural

        Does the item have architectural or artistic value for characteristics that may include its design, style, era, form, scale, materials, colour, texture, patina of age, quality of space, craftsmanship, smells, and sounds?

        The Coene Sheds and slipway are a group of light-industrial structures and infrastructure that are used for the storage and deployment of small boats. The sheds are much-altered but were designed in a local vernacular style that is typical of domestic architecture of the era.

      • Group

        Is the item part of a group of buildings, structures, or sites that taken together have coherence because of their age, history, style, scale, materials, or use?

        The Coene sheds and slipway have group value with the collection of other heritage buildings within the Clyde Quay Heritage Area, in particular the former club-house to the east which they sheds relate best to in form.

    • Historic Value close
      • Association

        Is the item associated with an important historic event, theme, pattern, phase, or activity?

        The collection of buildings in the boat harbour has a historic association with both the development of the harbour itself and boating in Wellington city.

      • Association

        Is the item associated with an important person, group, or organisation?

        The buildings and slipway are associated with the US Marines stationed in New Zealand during the Second World War.  It is also associated with the Royal Port Nicholson Yacht Club that was founded in 1883 and has been based at the boat harbour since 1905. 

    • Scientific Value close

      Not assessed

    • Social Value close
      • Identity/Sense Of Place/Continuity

        Is the item a focus of community, regional, or national identity? Does the item contribute to sense of place or continuity?

        The Coene Sheds have been in continuous use since 1959. They are an integral component of the heritage buildings, structures and objects that make up the Clyde Quay Boat Harbour Heritage Area. As such they contribute to the sense of place and continuity of the area.

    • Level of Cultural Heritage Significance close
      • Authentic

        Does the item have authenticity or integrity because it retains significant fabric from the time of its construction or from later periods when important additions or modifications were carried out?

        Despite modifications over the years, the sheds remain largely intact with a high level of original building fabric.

      • Importance

        Is the item important for any of the above characteristics at a local, regional, national, or international level?

        The sheds are of local importance, as they contribute to the Clyde Quay Boat Harbour Heritage Area.

    • Local / Regional / National / International Importance close

      Not assessed

  • close Site Detail
    • District Plan Number

      12/ 463

    • Legal Description

      Section 1 SO 24076

    • Heritage New Zealand Listed

      Not listed

    • Archaeological Site

      Risk unknown – c1905 reclaimed land

    • Current Uses

      unknown

    • Former Uses

      unknown

    • Has building been funded

      No

    • Funding Amount

      Not applicable

    • Earthquake Prone Status

      To be assessed

  • close Additional Information

Last updated: 8/1/2017 12:24:07 AM